The Ringing of the Chicks 29th June

It’s incredible how quickly time flies, and at nearly 6 weeks old it was time to ring and tag our osprey chicks yesterday. Whilst our male had witnessed similar events before, this was our new female’s first experience and as ever, our expert team worked as quickly and quietly as possible to minimise any stress to both the adults and the chicks.

Since we only had two satellite transmitters to attach, one of the chicks was ringed as Blue FR2 in the nest and left there for the duration of the tagging, providing reassurance for the adults as at least one chick was always visible. The other two were carefully lowered to the ground where the rings Blue FR3 and Blue FR4 were swiftly attached along with the satellite transmitters. Guessing from the weight of these two, it is possible that FR3 is a male and FR4 is a female as female chicks generally weigh more, however we cannot be sure. As soon as all of the necessary work was done, the chicks were safely returned to the nest and the family was left in peace.

Chick FR3 successfully ringed and tagged at Loch of the Lowes © Alba Landscapes - Ron Walsh

Chick FR3 successfully ringed and tagged at Loch of the Lowes © Alba Landscapes – Ron Walsh

Whilst the male was perched on a nearby tree carefully watching the chicks, the female was nowhere to be seen for a while after the chicks were returned. But to everyone’s relief she returned at 7.14pm last night to find all three chicks comfortably sleeping in the nest, and they all got a good feed when the male returned shortly after 10pm with a large fish. This morning all of our ospreys are looking well and behaving normally, giving us no cause for concern which is what we expected as events ran so smoothly.

All three chicks successfully ringed © Scottish Wildlife Trust

All three chicks successfully ringed © Scottish Wildlife Trust

 

The next milestone to look out for in our chick’s development will be them taking their first flight which usually happens around 53 days old, and we have already seen plenty of wing stretching and flapping in the nest!

Charlotte,

Perthshire Ranger.

Posted in Diary 2015 |

Ringing Update

The webcam is now back online – thank you to everyone for your patience during this very exciting time. I am happy to confirm that the ringing and tagging process went well, with all chicks ringed and two fitted with satellite transmitters – a more detailed account with photos will follow soon. All three chicks are safely back in the nest and whilst we are still waiting on our female osprey to return, the male is keeping a close eye on the nest from a nearby tree.

Charlotte,

Perthshire Ranger

Posted in Diary 2015 |

Chick ringing and tagging underway

Ringing and satellite tagging of the chicks at Loch of the Lowes is now underway.

As a result the webcam will be offline for a short period of time. Photos of the event will be posted later.

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Mystery Bird on Loch – Identified

From time to time, a ‘different’ bird is seen amongst the flocks of Canada Geese floating around Loch of the Lowes. At the moment, there is a Barnacle Goose, but recently there was a white headed, white tailed water bird which was proving hard to identify.

With thanks to the excellent detective work of one of our members, we can now state that this is a Blue Goose (Chen caerulescens) aka a Snow Goose. Each Spring they breed on the Arctic tundra in the very northern areas of Greenland, Canada and Alaska and then fly south to overwinter in the warmth of Mexico and Texas. Some make occasional visits to Britain and there is a small feral population in Scotland.

Osprey

There was a large female intruder osprey at Lowes this morning (and yesterday), easily identified by a missing wing feather. Today, when the male noticed her, he flew over and mated with her on the flat top tree. We were pleased to see him return to his nest duties an hour or so later by bringing in a large fish.

There’s never a dull day with wildlife to watch! Here’s a lovely photo of the Blue Goose on Loch of the Lowes © William Gillespie.

Snow Goose with adult plumage (grey/blue) is called a Blue Goose © William Gillespie

Snow Goose with adult plumage (grey/blue) is called a Blue Goose © William Gillespie

Posted in Diary 2015 |

Expect the unexpected at Loch of the Lowes

Over the last week we have had some unusual sightings which have delighted visitors, all the more so because they came ‘out of the blue’.

Not two, or three but four juvenile woodpeckers are currently visiting the feeding station. Initially they are being fed by the adults but quickly learn to swing on the peanut feeders and peck for themselves. A very pretty little roe deer doe suddenly appears in the woodland behind the feeders.  Unconcerned by her delighted audience, she grazes for a while then melts away, reappearing an hour or so later to surprise a new set of visitors. Two quietly feeding red squirrels will suddenly become whirling dervishes, flying up and down the trees and bouncing through the upper canopy.

In the middle of the afternoon, a pine marten decided to take a tour of Lowes.  It was around for long enough to be caught on camera, like the tiny fallow fawn galloping around in the woodland like a dog ‘having a silly minute’. Up in the osprey nest, the adults have brought in more sticks and clumps of moss, creating a higher barricade to keep their active chicks from stepping off the edge. There was a moment of panic when ‘something’ fell from the nest and could be seen toppling down the tree. For several ghastly seconds it was thought to have been a chick – it was a clump of moss! Relief!

There’s always the chance to experience the magical (I do not use the word lightly) sight of the male osprey catching a fish right in front of the hides.

A picture paints a thousand words, as they say, so with grateful thanks to Lisa Water for allowing us to post her stunning photographs, here’s a flavour of osprey watching at Loch of the Lowes.

 

Lowes Osprey Copyright Lisa Waters

Lowes Osprey Copyright Lisa Waters

Lowes male osprey. Photo copyright Lisa Waters

Lowes male osprey. Photo copyright Lisa Waters

Successful fishing by Lowes male osprey and very surprised Canada Goose! Photo copyright Lisa Waters

Successful fishing by Lowes male osprey and very surprised Canada Goose! Photo copyright Lisa Waters

 

It is Midsummer today – happy midsummer solstice to everyone from the Loch of the Lowes Team!

Cherry

Visitor Centre Assistant

 

Posted in Diary 2015 |

Come Rain or Shine!

The very changeable weather over the week-end did not bother the wildlife at all, even if the human visitors were shivering at times.

The ospreys continue to do well with all three chicks receiving plenty of food. Don’t worry if you only see two chicks feeding when you are here (or on the webcam).  The reason there is usually one laid ‘out for the count’ at the side is because it is still ‘stuffed to the gills’ from the earlier feed.

Over the last few days there have been a few intruding ospreys over Lowes. One of these birds has a blue leg ring but, so far, we have not been able to read the lettering.

As well as the ospreys, there has been plenty of wildlife action: red squirrels chasing each other, juvenile great spotted woodpeckers being fed by their parents, great crested grebes nest building in the lily pads (again!) and loads of yellow hammers in the feeding station.

As I write, the male osprey has just managed to swallow the whole tail (well, tail fins) of a fish in one go – with great difficulty and a lot of gulps. So, that answers the question (asked earlier by a visitor) do ospreys eat fins and tails? Oh yes!

Cherry

 

Posted in Diary 2015 |